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    Default Goddess - Bast









    Bast is seen as a female cat, the panther god. She is an egyptian deity, a patron to gay people, music and parties. She was originally a solar god such as Sekmet, but the greeks changed her. Cats are associated with the moon, lunar goddesses and witchcraft, as cats are seen as familiars. They were sacred to egyptians, cat mummies have been found.

    Other names for bast are Bastet or Pasht as the dark aspect. The black cat is her symbol. Black cats are also symbols for fighting against tyranny in modern times, (but egyptian doctors used it as a symbol for healing. (From dj conway moon magic).

    Also Bast was draped in green and carried a sistrum in her right hand and a basket in the other. She is the goddess of fire, moon, childbirth, fertility, pleasure, sex, music, dance, protection, intuition and healing.)

    Black cats were only seen as unlucky because of their association with witches. And if one crossed your path maybe an evil spirit was near that you needed protection from.

    I work with Bast because one of my totems is a lion at times a black jaguar/panther. My element is also fire, and moon workings are essential to me.





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    I do not have experience working with Bast per say, but would like to do something in regards to her this month as part of the gods and goddesses of the Month... I recently found a miniature bast cat statue I have and have placed her in front of my fireplace where I do yoga.

    So Bast was associated with the Sun, but now the moon. Her element remains fire?

    I have a black and white cat just as a side note, I'm not sure if he's a familiar, but he is very loved and loving.
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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    This is something I hadn't been aware of. I'm a Taurus, and thus it's quite intriguing to see the relation. I would have thought, as a cat, Bast would relate to Leo, but I suppose in Egyptian that would be the sphinx, rather than Bast.



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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Quote Originally Posted by brifae View Post







    Bast is seen as a female cat, the panther god. She is an egyptian deity, a patron to gay people, music and parties...


    Gay people? I never heard that about Bast. Where does that come from? Is that from more recent times?

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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Quote Originally Posted by Blank Rune View Post
    Gay people? I never heard that about Bast. Where does that come from? Is that from more recent times?
    Maybe, but gay people have been around since the beginning of time, I would suspect.

    Gay people do love good music and partying too, maybe there's the correlation.

    I wonder, are there more gay witches and wiccan males than straight considering wicca focuses a lot on the goddess? -- not solely though, wicca does focus on both, the god and goddess archetype, but I think leans more towards the sacred feminine does it not?
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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Bast


    Other Names: Bastet, Ailuros

    Patron of: the sun (originally), the moon (after the Greeks), cats, women, and secrets.

    Appearance: A desert cat, or a woman with the head of a cat (this form possibly dates after the domestication of the Egyptian wild cat).

    Description: Probably the most famous Egyptian goddess after Isis, Bast was said to be the daughter of Ra, though long after he created the primal gods. She was originally a sun goddess, but after contact with the Greeks, she changed to a moon goddess, probably due to the Greeks associating her with Artemis.

    Like Artemis, Bast was a wild goddess. To those who were in her favor, she gave great blessings, but her wrath was legendary and she was sometimes listed as one of Ra's avenging deities who punish the sinful and the enemies of Egypt. This is of course in keeping with her totem animal, the cat. Cats were sacred to Bast, and to harm one was deemed a great transgression. Bast's importance in the Egyptian pantheon might be due to the great value placed on the domesticated cat by the Egyptians. Cats curtailed the spread of disease by killing vermin, and though the idea of microbes was unknown to the ancient Egyptians, they must have noticed the connection between rats and disease.

    Her worship was widespread, and her cult apparently had a great deal of power. Bubastis was even the capital of Egypt for a time during the Late Period, and some pharaohs took her name in their king-names. Herodotus' description of her temple at Bubastis is that of a place of great splendor and beauty, rivaled only by the temples to Ra and Horus.

    Worship: Worshipped widely throughout Egypt, her cult center was at Bubastis.

    http://www.touregypt.net/godsofegypt/bast.htm

    **************************************************************************************************** *

    WIKI:

    From lion-goddess to cat-goddess
    From the third millennium B.C., when Bastet begins to appear in our record, she is depicted as either a fierce lioness or a woman with the head of a lion.[3] Images of Bast were created from a local stone, named alabaster today.[citation needed]
    Originally she was viewed as the protector goddess of Lower Egypt. As protector, she was seen as defender of the pharaoh, and consequently of the later chief male deity, Ra, who was also a solar deity, gaining her the titles Lady of Flame and Eye of Ra.
    Her role in the pantheon became diminished as Sekhmet, a similar lioness war deity, became more dominant in the unified culture of Lower and Upper Egypt.[citation needed]
    In the first millennium BC, when domesticated cats were popularly kept as pets, Bastet began to be represented as a woman with the head of a cat and ultimately emerged as the Egyptian cat-goddess par excellence.[3] In the Middle Kingdom, the domestic cat appeared as Bastetís sacred animal and after the New Kingdom she was depicted as a woman with the head of a cat or a lioness, carrying a sacred rattle and a box or basket.[4]
    Bubastis
    She was a local deity whose cult was centred in the city of Bubastis, now Tell Basta, which lay in the Delta near what is known as Zagazig today.[3][4] The town, known in Egyptian as pr-bȝstt (also transliterated as Per-Bast), carries her name, literally meaning "House of Bastet". It was known in Greek as Boubastis (Βούβαστος) and translated into Hebrew as PÓ-beset. In the biblical Book of Ezekiel 30:17, the town appears in the Hebrew form Pibeseth.[3]
    [edit] Temple

    Herodotus, a Greek historian who travelled in Egypt in the 5th century B.C., describes Bastet's temple at some length:

    "save for the entrance, it stands on an island; two separate channels approach it from the Nile, and after coming up to the entry of the temple, they run round it on opposite sides; each of them is an hundred feet wide, and overshadowed by trees. The temple is in the midst of the city, the whole circuit of which commands a view down into it; for the city's level has been raised, but that of the temple has been left as it was from the first, so that it can be seen into from without. A stone wall, carven with figures, runs round it; within is a grove of very tall trees growing round a great shrine, wherein is the image of the goddess; the temple is a square, each side measuring a furlong. A road, paved with stone, of about three furlongs' length leads to the entrance, running eastward through the market place, towards the temple of Hermes; this road is about four hundred wide, and bordered by trees reaching to heaven."[5]
    The description offered by Herodotus and several Egyptian texts suggest that water surrounded the temple on three (out of four) sides, forming a type of lake known as isheru, not too dissimilar from that surrounding the Temple of the goddess Mut in Karnak at Thebes.[3] Lakes known as isheru were typical of temples devoted to a number of leonine goddesses who are said to represent one original goddess, daughter of the Sun-God Re / Eye of Re: Bastet, Mut, Tefnut, Hathor and Sakhmet.[3] Each of them had to be appeased by a specific set of rituals.[3] One myth relates that a lioness, fiery and wrathful, was once cooled down by the water of the lake, transformed into a gentle cat and settled in the temple.[3]
    [edit] Festival

    Herodotus also relates that of the many solemn festivals held in Egypt, the most important and most popular one was that celebrated in Bubastis in honour of the goddess, whom he calls Bubastis and equates with the Greek goddess Artemis.[6][7] Each year on the day of her festival, the town is said to have attracted some 700,000 visitors ("as the people of the place say"), both men and women (but not children), who arrived in numerous crowded ships. The women engaged in music, song and dance on their way to the place, great sacrifices were made and prodigious amounts of wine were drunk, more than was the case throughout the year.[8] This accords well with Egyptian sources which prescribe that leonine goddesses are to be appeased with the "feasts of drunkenness".[2]
    The goddess Bast was sometimes depicted holding a ceremonial sistrum in one hand and an aegis in the other Ė the aegis usually resembling a collar or gorget embellished with a lioness head.
    Bast was a goddess of the sun throughout most of Ancient Egyptian history, but later when she was changed into a cat goddess rather than a lioness, she was changed to a goddess of the moon by Greeks occupying Ancient Egypt toward the end of its civilization. In Greek mythology, Bast also is known as Ailuros.
    History and connection to other gods
    Bastet
    in hieroglyphs

    Cats in ancient Egypt were revered highly, partly due to their ability to combat vermin such as mice, rats - which threatened key food supplies - and snakes, especially cobras. Cats of royalty were, in some instances, known to be dressed in golden jewelry and were allowed to eat from their owners' plates. Turner and Bateson estimate that during the Twenty-second dynasty c.945-715 B.C., Bastet worship changed to being a major cat deity (as opposed to a lioness deity).[9] With the unification of the two Egypts, many similar deities were merged into one or the other, the significance of Bast and Sekhmet, to the regional cultures that merged, resulted in a retention of both, necessitating a change to one or the other. During later dynasties, Bast was assigned a lesser role in the pantheon, but retained.
    In the temple at Per-Bast some cats were found to have been mummified and buried, many next to their owners. More than 300,000 mummified cats were discovered when Bast's temple at Per-Bast was excavated. The main source of information about the Bast cult comes from Herodotus who visited Bubastis around 450 B.C. during the heyday of the cult. He equated Bastet with the Greek Goddess Artemis. He wrote extensively about the cult. Turner and Bateson suggest that the status of the cat was roughly equivalent to that of the cow in modern India. The death of a cat might leave a family in great mourning and those who could would have them embalmed or buried in cat cemeteries - pointing to the great prevalence of the cult of Bastet. Extensive burials of cat remains were found not only at Bubastis, but also at Beni Hasan and Saqqara. In 1888, a farmer uncovered a plot of many hundreds of thousands of cats in Beni Hasan.[9]
    The lioness represented the war goddess and protector of both lands. As the fierce lion god Maahes of Nubia later became part of Egyptian mythology, during the time of the New Kingdom, Bastet was held to be the daughter of Amun Ra, a newly ascending deity in the Egyptian pantheon during that late dynasty. Bastet became identified as his mother in the Lower Egypt, near the delta. Similarly the fierce lioness war goddess Sekhmet, became identified as the mother of Maashes in the Upper Egypt.

    Wadjet-Bast, with a lioness head of Bast, the solar disk, and the cobra that represents Wadjet


    As divine mother, and more especially as protector, for Lower Egypt, Bastet became strongly associated with Wadjet, the patron goddess of Lower Egypt. She eventually became Wadjet-Bast, paralleling the similar pair of patron (Nekhbet) and lioness protector (Sekhmet) for Upper Egypt.

    Later perception
    Later scribes sometimes renamed her Bastet, a variation on Bast consisting of an additional feminine suffix to the one already present, thought to have been added to emphasize pronunciation; perhaps it is a diminutive name applied as she receded in the ascendancy of Sekhmet in the Egyptian pantheon. Since Bastet literally meant, (female) of the ointment jar,[citation needed] Her name was related with the lavish jars in which Egyptians stored their perfume. Bast thus gradually became regarded as the goddess of perfumes, earning the title, perfumed protector. In connection with this, when Anubis became the god of embalming, Bast, as goddess of ointment, came to be regarded as his wife. The association of Bastet as mother of Anubis, was broken years later when Anubis became identified as the son of Nephthys.

    Ancient Egyptian statue of Bastet



    The Gayer-Anderson cat, believed to be a representation of Bastet


    Lower Egypt's loss in the wars between Upper and Lower Egypt led to a decrease in the ferocity of Bast. Thus, by the Middle Kingdom she came to be regarded as a domestic cat rather than a lioness. Occasionally, however, she was depicted holding a lioness mask, hinting at her potential ferocity.
    Because domestic cats tend to be tender and protective of their offspring, Bast also was regarded as a good mother, and she was sometimes depicted with numerous kittens. Consequently, a woman who wanted children sometimes wore an amulet showing the goddess with kittens, the number of which indicated her own desired number of children.
    Eventually, her position as patron and protector of Lower Egypt led to her being identified with the more substantial goddess Mut, whose cult had risen to power with that of Amun, and eventually being syncretized with her as Mut-Wadjet-Bast. Shortly after, in the constantly evolving pantheon, Mut also absorbed the identities of the Sekhmet-Nekhbet pairing as well.
    This merging of identities of similar goddesses has led to considerable confusion, leading to some attributing to Bastet the title Mistress of the Sistrum (more properly belonging to Hathor, who had become thought of as an aspect of the later emerging Isis, as had Mut), and the Greek idea of her as a lunar goddess (more properly an attribute of Mut) rather than the solar deity she was. The native Egyptian rulers were replaced by Greeks during an occupation of Egypt that lasted almost five hundred years. These new rulers adopted many Egyptian beliefs and customs, but always "interpreted" them in relation to their Greek culture. These associations sought to link the antiquity of Egyptian culture to the newer Greek culture, thereby lending parallel roots and a sense of continuity. Indeed, much confusion occurred with subsequent generations; the identity of Bast slowly merged among the Greeks during their occupation of Egypt, who sometimes named her Ailuros (Greek for cat), thinking of Bast as a version of Artemis, their own moon goddess. Thus, to fit their own cosmology, to the Greeks Bast is thought of as the sister of Horus, whom they identified as Apollo (Artemis' brother), and consequently, the daughter of the later emerging deities, Isis and Ra. Roman occupation of Egypt followed in 30 B.C., and their pantheon of deities also was identified with the Greek interpretations of the Ancient Egyptians. The introduction of Christianity and Muslim beliefs followed as well, and by the sixth century A.D. only a few vestiges of Ancient Egyptian religious beliefs remained, although the cult of Isis had spread to the ends of the Roman Empire.

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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Quote Originally Posted by Blank Rune View Post
    Gay people? I never heard that about Bast. Where does that come from? Is that from more recent times?
    Hmm. Never heard of that connection before, either.

    Does make sense in a way, given her heavy leanings, by the definition given, as being very much of the fifth house.

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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Quote Originally Posted by Celtaur View Post
    I wonder, are there more gay witches and wiccan males than straight considering wicca focuses a lot on the goddess?
    Hmm. Isn't the goddess much more powerful when given rein under her consort than when not?

    It may actually be such a perception that puts many "manly" types from getting involved - not just in the wicca arena, but any form of alternative thinking, which always seems to be considered effete to some extent. Most of the guys that I have come across (sic.) are fairly well connected to their feminine side, without this necessarily being reflected in their sexual preferences. Indeed, a couple of goddess types (female) have even indicated the non-acceptance of gay men within their group, as they are only interested in "real men" who can satisfy the goddess...

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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Bast, Goddess

    of Protection and Pleasure



    Bast, Egyptian goddess of sensual pleasure, protector of the household, bringer of health, and the guardian saint of firefighters -- she was the original mistress of multi-tasking!
    Also called Bastet or Basthet, the goddess Bast is widely known today as the "Cat Goddess". Legend has it that, by day, Bast would ride through the sky with her father, the sun god Ra, his boat pulling the sun through the sky.
    Ever watchful, she protected Ra from his enemies. Thus she became known as the Lady of the East, the Goddess of the Rising Sun, and The Sacred and All-Seeing Eye.



    But by night, she was a different creature entirely! Bast transformed herself into a cat (renown for its superb night vision) to guard her father from Apep (also known as Apophis), a serpent who was her father's greatest enemy.
    Ra's priests burned wax models of the snake and wrote his name with green ink, trying to put a "hex" on him -- but to no avail. Finally, with her cat eyes shining in the dark, she managed to kill the evil serpent.
    Credited with killing the vile Apep, the goddess Bast ensured the warmth of the sun would continue to bless the delta of the Nile with fertile soil and abundant crops and was honored as a goddess of fertility.
    Because of her all-seeing sacred eye (called the utchat) that magically saw through the dark, Bast is one of the few sun goddesses that is also classified as a moon goddess...with her glowing cat's eye reminding us of the moon that it reflects.

    One of the most ancient of the Egyptian goddesses, she is depicted as a slender woman having the head of a domestic cat. Sometimes she is shown holding a sistrum, a rattle used as a musical instrument in ancient times. Agile and lithe, Bast was recognized as the goddess of music and dance.
    The worship of Bast began around 3,500 B.C.E., before the invention of writing. In 950 B.C.E. it became the 'national religion' when her hometown, Baubastis, became the capitol of Egypt.
    Her shrine in Baubastis, fashioned from blocks of pink granite and the lengthy entrance lined with enormous trees, was considered to be one of the most beautiful temples in the world.
    The grounds of the templeheld an extensive cat cemetery, where her beloved companions after being mummified, were entombed so they could join Bast in the spirit world.
    Cats were honored in the temples of Bast and many felines were in permanent residence there. If a local house caught on fire, the cats would be dispatched to run into the flames, drawing them out of the building. (History's first record of a fire brigade!)
    Undoubtedly many returned to the temple a bit singed, but as heroes of the townspeople. Any unfortunate kitty who perished in the undertaking would be restored to life by the goddess Bast. This is possibly the source of the belief that cats have nine lives.

    Consistent with her cat-like image and her status as a fertility goddess, Bast was associated with childbirth, perhaps because of the mother cat's continuous production of litters and the loving way she fiercely defends and cares for her kittens.
    As a gentler, more benevolent, evolution of the lion-headed goddess Sekhmet, her violent and bloody sister who could bring plagues, the goddess Bast could be invoked to prevent the spread of illness.
    Most households contained a small statue of Bast as a form of household protection . . . The All-Seeing Eye, to ward off thieves. . . as the Cat Goddess, to keep the house free of snakes. . . and as the healer to ward off infectious diseases.
    An amulet with the utchat (all-seeing eye) hung over the door deterred thieves and vandals, placed over the mantel it averted illness, worn around the neck it protected you as you traveled. An amulet featuring a mother cat with several kittens suckling or playing at her feet was often given as a wedding present to a bride, invoking the help of the goddess to insure that a woman would be able to conceive and bear children
    Bast, more than any other of the Egyptian goddesses was perceived as a protector and friend of women and young children. It is hardly surprising that the ancient Greeks referred to Bast as "The Egyptian Artemis".


    Does this goddess sound like a gal that the phrase "sex kitten" would be invented for? Hardly! But, of course, there is more to the story than we've told so far; we saved the juicy parts for last.
    For starters, one of the oldest versions of the goddess Bast was known by the name 'Pasht', from which our word passion was derived. (And from which the English term "Puss" may have arisen.)
    Her name itself shares the hieroglyph of a bas-jar, a large pottery jar, usually filled with expensive perfume, a valuable commodity in a hot climate. Indeed, her son Nefertem, a sun god, became the Egyptian god of alchemy and perfumes.
    It's not surprising she had a reputation, since she herself had three husbands and was acknowledged as a sexual partner of every god and goddess (explaining her association with lesbians, although bisexuality would be a more accurate description of her nature).
    The rituals performed in her temples, designed for healing, protection, and insuring fertility, were decidedly sensual, full of music and dancing The priestesses of Bast, dressed in "her color" which was red, and were the first "strippers", famous for their erotic dancing.
    Many festivals were held in her honor, and they tended to be quite rowdy affairs. During the major festival, thousands of men and women (children weren't invited) traveled on barges down the river to Baubastis, drinking and partying mightily.
    With loud music, women shaking their rattles, others gyrating in dance, and some lifting their skirts while making lewd comments to the townspeople lined up on the riverbank to watch the procession, the feasts of Bast may have been a precursor to the Mardi Gras and Carnivale. Some think that it is even the basis for the word "floats" that describe the decorated rides in a parade.
    The Egyptian goddess Bast reminds us of all that is feline and feminine. Her gifts, very cat-like in nature, include the refusal to be at everyone's beck and call and an insistence on the freedom of expression.
    She teaches us to relax and never waste energy, reminding us to luxuriate in beauty, perfume, and to sway in graceful movement. Bast refuses to take anything too seriously.
    But most importantly, Bast leads us to accept the true nature of things (ourselves included) and helps us remain unswayed by the opinion of others.
    Curled up like a cat lying in the sun, the goddess Bast foms a complete circle . . . a symbol of the eternal.

    Reference: http://www.goddessgift.com/goddess-m...ddess_bast.htm

    I own a Bast Pendant that I bought many years ago, and honestly as much as she appealed/s to me I can't for the life of me remember why I bought it.....
    I'm an Indigo Aquarian, that should explain everything

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    Default Re: Goddess - Bast


    Quote Originally Posted by Celtaur View Post
    Maybe, but gay people have been around since the beginning of time, I would suspect.

    Gay people do love good music and partying too, maybe there's the correlation.

    I wonder, are there more gay witches and wiccan males than straight considering wicca focuses a lot on the goddess? -- not solely though, wicca does focus on both, the god and goddess archetype, but I think leans more towards the sacred feminine does it not?
    I too have never heard of this reference. (the above article explains it a bit more)

    The gay community tends to lean towards Wicca/Paganism due to their acceptance and non-judgement of their sexual preferance.
    I'm an Indigo Aquarian, that should explain everything

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